News

Warm the Soles

Student Council, 6th-Grade Teachers and Nebo Credit Union Employees
Presenting the donation
Dancing the Reindeer Hop

On December 20, 2010 the East Meadows’ Student Council presented a donation of $907 to Nebo Credit Union. This money will be used for ‘Warm the Soles,’ a program that provides shoes for children in need. Since their participation in the program, the credit union has provided over 2000 pairs of shoes. This year through the help of generous donations from students, school staff members, credit union members and employees, they were able to purchase 350 pairs of shoes. East Meadows Elementary is happy to be among 38 schools to participate in the program. The 'Warm the Soles' assembly also included a special visitor from the North Pole. To add to the Christmas fun, students danced the reindeer hop for Santa.

Polar Express

Grace Luu
Polar Express Train

All aboard for the polar express ride through the halls of East Meadows Elementary. Students in the first grade turned ordinary boxes into decorative and fun train cars. The students lined up their box cars, waited for the horn to toot and then filled the halls with beautiful Christmas trains. Parents and family enjoyed taking pictures as the train came through.

6th Grade Medival Feast and Tournament

6th Grade Medival Feast 2010.JPG
6th Grade Medival Feast 2010-5.JPG
6th Grade Medival Feast 2010-2.JPG

East Meadows 6th graders enjoyed a day of medieval games and feasting on Friday, December 10, 2010. As part of their social studies, students learned about the medieval times and what it might have been like to live during that period. Some of their activities included sword-fighting, jousting, dancing and melee (a mock battle between two armed horsemen). MaKenna Briggs said she especially liked learning about the knights’ armor and jousting.  In this picture Emma Brinkerhoff and Sydnee Farrer try their skills at sword fighting.

3rd Grade Native American Plays

3rd grade Native American Plays-Mrs. Mechams Class - The Cannibal Monster-A Tlinget Legend
3rd Grade Native American Plays-Mrs. Bartons Class -The Birth and Creation of the Corn Dog
3rd Grade Native American Plays-Mrs. Biggs Class-The Strongest One
3rd Grade Native American Plays-Mrs. Wilsons Class -The Glusabe Monster and Old Man Winter
3rd Grade Native American Plays-Mrs. McQuiveys Class -A Possum's Tail

The third graders at East Meadows Elementary have recently been learning about Native American Culture.  On Wednesday, December 8, each class performed a play depicting the culture of Native Americans.  Mrs. Barton’s class performed “The Birth and Creation of the Corn God.”  Mrs. McQuivey’s class did, “A Possum’s Tail.”  Mrs. Bigg’s class dazzled us with “The Strongest One.”  Mrs. Mecham’s class acted out “The Cannibal Monster--A Tlingit Legend” and Mrs. Wilson’s class performed “The Glusabe and Old Man Winter.”  Leading up to this culminating event, students had previously learned the meaning of legends, made pottery out of play dough, and created teepees out of paper.

Christmas Book Share

Principal Dwight Liddiard and Katherin Beck, CFA

For more than a decade Dwight Liddiard, East Meadows Principal, and Katherine Beck, Clinical Faculty Advisor for Brigham Young University, have been sharing Christmas books with educators, librarians and others interested in hearing about great new stories. Katherine and Dwight researched and reviewed books copyrighted in 2010 and chose 31 well-written and nicely-illustrated Christmas books. On December 2, people gathered at East Meadows to hear summaries of these books. Some of the titles chosen this year were: Christmas With Tucker, Tacky’s Christmas, Jackie’s Gift (Jackie Robinson’s story), and a 1956 reprint of The Year Without a Santa Claus. This tradition has provided a wonderful venue for gathering information about holiday books worth purchasing. For those unable to attend, the list of books can be found on the East Meadows Elementary website, http://eastmeadows.nebo.edu.

Stained Glass Windows at East Meadows

Morgan Scott, Payton Lewis and Hannah Jackson display their stained-glass windows.
Students in Mrs. Hughes class making stained-glass windows
Students in Mrs. Andersen's class making stained-glass windows
Students in Mrs. Goldsmith's class making stained-glass windows
Students in Mrs. Hogle's class making stained-glass windows.

If you have attended elementary schools in the local area, chances are you have probably participated in a favorite Christmas tradition. LaRee Liddiard, elementary school teacher in Nephi, created her own paper patterns of angels, stockings, wreaths, lanterns and other Christmas designs many years ago. Students added the tissue paper and carefully crafted their design. The decorations were then placed on windows around the school. When LaRee retired, she passed on these patterns to her son Dwight Liddiard, principal, who has been carrying on the tradition at different schools for 27 years. East Meadows 5th-grade students recently finished their decorations and the school windows are now adorned with these stained-glass patterns for all to enjoy until the Christmas holidays.

Olympic Park

Pictured sitting in the bobsled are Danica Butler, Courtney Andersen and Natalie Reese.
5th Grade Olympic Park Visit
5th Grade Olympic Park Visit
5th Grade Olympic Park Visit
Olympic Park Mascots
5th Grade Olympic Park Visit
5th Grade Olympic Park Visit

East Meadows 5th graders took the opportunity to visit Olympic Park near Park City. Olympic Park served as the 2002 Olympic venue for ski jumping, Nordic Combined, Bobsled, Skeleton and the Luge. Besides seeing how snow is great for a lot of fun winter activities, the students learned that snow is also important to Utah’s economy. In fact snow is called ‘white gold,’ and without it industries would economically suffer. Students enjoyed looking at the event rides and watching people do some practice runs. They were amazed at how fast the riders zoomed by.

Reading to Recess

Lisie Dixon and Courtney Acosta with East Meadows third-grade students
Spanish Fork High School students read to 3rd-grade students.
Spanish Fork High School students read to 3rd-grade students.

East Meadows Elementary students were privileged to have Spanish Fork High School athletes and student council members come to the school to read and play with them today, November 18. This is a fun tradition the high school participates in. These high school students want kids to get excited about not just playing sports but reading and learning also. Lisie Dixon told third-grade class members, “you are lucky that you get to come to school and learn to read . . . knowing how to read can help you in all subjects.” After reading to the classes, the high school students joined the elementary students on the playground for recess. Third-grader Kelly Gardner said, “My favorite part was tackling them.”

Museum on the Move

4th Graders Studying Rocks & Minerals
4th Graders Studying Rocks & Minerals
4th Graders Studying Rocks & Minerals
4th Graders Studying Rocks & Minerals

East Meadows 4th graders were scientists-in-action today, November 15. Carolyn Firestone, representative from the University of Utah, Museum of Natural History brought the mini-museum to the school so students could learn about rocks and minerals. Museum on the Move (Mom) addresses the Utah core curriculum in science. Instead of lecturing to students, MoM focuses on allowing students to think and process like actual scientists. Students observed specimens, questioned and made inferences, researched, and recorded thoughts and ideas. Schools participating in MoM can choose from four different studies: Rocks and Minerals, Fossils, Animals and the Great Salt Lake.

5th Grade D.A.R.E. Graduation

Pictured are outstanding D.A.R.E. students and essay winners: Seth Jones, Andrew Rasmussen, Ethan Bodmer, Riley Warren, Officer Chris Sheriff, Kylie Hales, Hannah Taylor, Bailee Jensen, Kennedy Kindrick and James Huff
D.A.R.E. Graduation Program
D.A.R.E. Graduation Program
D.A.R.E. Graduation Program

On Thursday, November 11, East Meadows 5th graders became D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) graduates. Officer Chris Sherriff welcomed family and friends as he commended the 5th graders for completing their 10-week educational training. In order to receive their graduation certificates, students participated in class discussions and activities, learned songs, and wrote thoughtful essays on why it is important to stay away from drugs and other harmful substances. Students liked trying out the officer’s handcuffs but admitted they would never want to be in a situation where they had to wear them. Principal Dwight Liddiard commented that the school is lucky to have a full-time officer spend time working with and teaching students. He also reminded the students that life is about making choices and they should look to the right people when making those choices.

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